Does Magnesium Help with Sleep?

Andreas Meistad@s profile picture
Andreas Meistad
Jan 10, 20234 min read

Does Magnesium Help with Sleep?

If you're having trouble getting a good night's sleep, you may have considered trying a natural remedy such as magnesium. But does magnesium really help with sleep? Here's what the research says.

First, it's important to understand how magnesium affects the body. Magnesium is a mineral that plays a key role in many bodily functions, including muscle and nerve function, heart health, and bone strength. It's also involved in the synthesis of hormones and neurotransmitters, which are chemical messengers that help regulate sleep.

Are There Benefits of Using Magnesium for Sleep?

There is some evidence to suggest that magnesium can improve sleep quality. One study found that taking a daily magnesium supplement led to a significant increase in the number of time participants spent in deep sleep, as well as a decrease in the number of awakenings. Other research has found that magnesium may help reduce the time it takes to fall asleep and may improve the overall quality of sleep.

So, how does magnesium improve sleep? It's thought that magnesium helps regulate the production of melatonin, the hormone that regulates sleep-wake cycles. Magnesium may also help reduce stress and anxiety, which can interfere with sleep. Additionally, magnesium is involved in muscle relaxation, which can help you feel more relaxed and comfortable in bed.

It's worth noting that not all research on magnesium and sleep has been positive. Some studies have found no significant difference in sleep quality in people taking magnesium supplements compared to those taking a placebo. It's also important to keep in mind that everyone is different, and what works for one person may not work for another.

If you're considering trying magnesium as a sleep aid, it's a good idea to talk to your healthcare provider first. They can help you determine the appropriate dosage and advise you on any potential risks or interactions with other medications you may be taking.

What Supplements can be taken?

There are a few different forms of magnesium that can be taken as supplements, including magnesium oxide, magnesium citrate, and magnesium glycinate. Magnesium oxide is the most common form, but it's not as easily absorbed as some of the other forms. Magnesium citrate is a more readily absorbed form, but it can have a laxative effect in high doses. Magnesium glycinate is well-absorbed and is less likely to cause digestive side effects, but it may be more expensive.

In addition to taking supplements, you can also get your daily dose of magnesium from foods such as nuts, seeds, legumes, and leafy green vegetables. If you're looking for a natural way to improve your sleep, incorporating these foods into your diet may be worth a try.

It's worth noting that magnesium is just one factor that can affect sleep quality. There are many other things you can do to improve your sleep, including creating a relaxing bedtime routine, keeping a consistent sleep schedule, and avoiding caffeine and electronics before bed.

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Conclusion

In conclusion, while there is some evidence to suggest that magnesium may help with sleep, more research is needed to fully understand its effects. If you're considering trying magnesium as a sleep aid, it's a good idea to speak with your healthcare provider first. They can help you determine the appropriate dosage and advise you on any potential risks or interactions. In addition to supplements, you can also get your daily dose of magnesium from foods such as nuts, seeds, legumes, and leafy green vegetables. Remember, improving sleep is a multifaceted process, and magnesium may be just one part of the puzzle.

CBT-I: A Long-Term Sleep Fix

Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a natural, side effect-free sleep treatment. It involves relearning your sleep habits and addressing issues that are getting in the way of quality sleep. Studies show that CBT-I works as well as or better than sleep medications and that its effects last after the treatment is done.1

Fill out Dawn Health’s questionnaire to get started with CBT-I right from your computer — no in-person visits necessary. Quality, natural sleep is possible when you embark on a CBT-I treatment journey.


Andreas Meistad@s profile picture
Andreas Meistad

Therapist specializing in applying CBT principles for the treatment of insomnia.

It’s time to stop blaming the night monsters.

Let’s work together to transform your sleep for the better.