Sleep Apnea ICD 10

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Rahul Shivkumar
Jan 18, 20234 min read
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Sleep Apnea ICD 10

Sleep apnea is a serious sleep disorder that occurs when a person's breathing is repeatedly interrupted during sleep. The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA, which occurs when the muscles in the back of the throat fail to keep the airway open. As a result, the person is briefly awakened many times throughout the night in order to open the airway. These awakenings are usually so brief that a person does not remember them.

The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) is a medical classification system that is used to code and classify diseases, disorders, and injuries. The 10th revision of the ICD, or ICD-10, is the most recent version of the system and is used by healthcare providers and insurance companies to report and track diagnoses.

The ICD-10 code for sleep apnea is G47.33. This code is used to indicate that a person has been diagnosed with OSA and is being treated for the condition. It is important to note that the ICD-10 code for sleep apnea is specific to OSA, and there are separate codes for other types of sleep apnea such as central sleep apnea and complex sleep apnea syndrome.

Symptoms of sleep apnea include loud snoring, witnessed episodes of breathing cessation during sleep, episodes of choking or gasping during sleep, excessive daytime sleepiness, morning headache, difficulty staying asleep (insomnia), difficulty paying attention while awake, forgetfulness, and mood changes. People with sleep apnea often have a hard time staying asleep, which can lead to fatigue and a lack of energy during the day.

Risk factors for sleep apnea include obesity, male gender, family history of sleep apnea, older age, and certain medical conditions such as hypothyroidism and acromegaly.

There are several treatment options for sleep apnea. The most common treatment is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which uses a machine to deliver a steady stream of air through a mask that is worn over the nose and/or mouth. This helps to keep the airway open and prevent episodes of breathing cessation.

Another treatment option is mandibular advancement device (MAD) which is a dental appliance that is worn in the mouth and helps to keep the airway open by repositioning the jaw.

Surgery is also an option for people with sleep apnea, particularly those with structural abnormalities in the upper airway such as large tonsils or a deviated septum.

Lifestyle changes such as losing weight, avoiding alcohol and sedatives, and sleeping on your side can also help to alleviate symptoms of sleep apnea.

It is important to seek medical attention if you suspect that you or a loved one may have sleep apnea. Left untreated, sleep apnea can lead to serious health complications such as high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, and diabetes.

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Conclusion

In conclusion, sleep apnea is a serious sleep disorder that occurs when a person's breathing is repeatedly interrupted during sleep. The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea, or OSA, which is caused by the failure of the muscles in the back of the throat to keep the airway open. The ICD-10 code for sleep apnea is G47.33, and it is used to indicate that a person has been diagnosed with OSA and is being treated for the condition. Treatment options for sleep apnea include CPAP, MAD, surgery, and lifestyle changes. It is important to seek medical attention if you suspect that you or a loved one may have sleep apnea.

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Rahul Shivkumar

Software Engineer & Sleep Enthusiast

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